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Marine News & T.V.

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www.defensenewstv.com

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Defense News Media Group
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www.armedforcesjournal.com
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www.tsjonline.com

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All the voluteers involved in this effort are military voluteers stationed in areas that are in harm's way.  You send your support (Letters and/or packages) addressed to them and when the see the "Attn Any, Soldier, Marine, Sailor or Coast Guard line in their address they put your letters and packages into the hands of that service member who don't get much or any mail first.  Everything is shared.

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Welcome Message

Business Address
One Lafayette Plaisance Suite 912
Detroit, Michigan 48207
 Office: 313.300.0165

Detroit

 

RBM

Detroit, Michigan is home to “America’s Greatest Generation” where during WWII the automotive industry converted its gigantic plants into production of the world’s most formidable wartime machine to produce warplanes, bombers, tanks, military vehicles, and ammunition in order to fight the “Two Ocean War” against Nazi Germany and Japan. Since that time Detroit has earned the motif of “The Arsenal of Democracy”.

During that era, America recruited a significant number its very first Black recruits into the United States Marine Corps on June 1, 1942 after passage of President FDR’s Executive Order 8802 which ended discrimination in the Defense industryand in the armed services of the United States.  The impact on the Marine Corps was that it abolished a 167 year color barrier that denied enlistment of men of color.

The history about the Marines of Montford Point has been one of America’s best kept military secrets until recent years.  Their story is that of the Marines Corps Black “hidden heores” who were coerced to train at a segregated facility “away from whites” known as “Montford Point” located at New River (MCB) Camp Lejuene, N.C.  This Jim Crow policy against Blacks prevailed until 1949 when President Truman enacted Executive Order 9901 which finally desegregated the Marine Corps.

Today, a number of these “hidden heroes” are still active participating members of the Montford Point Marines of Michigan, Inc and remain to give their first-hand accounts that dispel all myths “that no Blacks fought in combat during WWII”. They can tell you how they fought in the Battle of Saipan, Invasion of Peleliu, Okinawa, and Iwo Jima, and many denied promotions or recognition. However, Time Magazine war correspondent Robert Sherrod wrote in his article dated July, 1944 that the Marines of Montford Point ranked a 4.0 (Annapolis’s highest performance mark of perfection) from their commanding officer Colonel Earl Phillips as they conducted themselves in combat. Also, in February 1945, Sherrod wrote about a group of Black Marines from the 51st Defense Battalion in the 2nd and 3rd wave to reach the beachhead on Iwo Jima performing magnificently under fire. Each year hundreds of people travel from all over the nation to attend the annual Montford Point Marines Military Heritage Banquet in June in honor of the Nation’s first Black U.S. Marines that paved the way for many generations of Afro-American Marines to follow. As you enter this website you will discover a number of  Black marines who have their indelible mark in Marine Corps tradition and American history.

 

           Robert B. Middleton
   President

 

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Congressional Gold Medal Recipients
A 501 (c) 3 Tax Exempt Public Charity

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Scheduled Meetings

Chapter Meeting Dates for remainder of the Year 2013

September 21

October 19

November 16

December 21


All meetings are held every third Saturday of the Month from 9:00am-1:00pm located at 2951 Woodward Ave.(corner of Temple )in the Vietnam Veterans of America Bldg.

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On July 20, 2010 Mr. Burr (for himself and Mr. Burris) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the committee on the judiciary On July 22, 2010 committee discharged; considered and agreed to 'Resolution' Designating August 26, 2010, as 'Montford Point Marines Day'.

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Monument Project

To construct a fitting memorial to honor the 20,000 African American Marines who fought for the "Right to Fight” and to educate and inspire youth and Marines (Past / Present / Future) and instill the value of perseverance.

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Book Ordering

THE HISTORY OF THE WWII MONTFORD POINT MARINES BELONGS IN YOUR FAMILY LIBRARY AND MAY BE PASSED ON FUTURE GENERATIONS WITH BOOKS AND DVD’S. TRACE OUR MA-RINE CORPS LINEAGE FROM THE 51ST DEFENSE BATTALION, 52ND DEFENSE BATTALION, AND OTHER UNITS WHICH WERE ORGANIZED UNDER THE FLEET MARINE FORCE AND THE 18TH DEPOT COMPANY UNTIL 1949 WHEN PRES. TRUMAN PASSED EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981.

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Veterans History Project Logo -- Click to visit the Veterans History Project.

The Veterans History Project collects, preserves, and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. Created and authorized by Congress, the Veterans History Project received unanimous support in the House and Senate and was signed into law on October 27, 2000.

Organized at Montford Point Camp, New River, North Carolina, this was the first of two defense battalions commanded by white officers, but organized from among African American Marines who had trained at Montford Point. Colonel Samuel Woods, Jr., who commanded the Montford Point Camp, formed the battalion and became its first commanding officer. Lieutenant Colonel William B. Onley took over in March 1943 and Lieutenant Colonel Floyd A. Stephenson in April. The initial plan called for the 51st to be a composite unit with infantry and pack-howitzer elements, but in June 1943 it became a conventional defense battalion. Lieutenant Curtis W. LeGette assumed command in January 1944 and took the battalion to Nanoumea and Funafuti in the Ellice Islands, where it arrived by the end of February 1944. In September, the 51st deployed to Eniwetok in the Marshalls where, in December, Lieutenant Colonel Gould P. Groves became battalion commander, a post he would hold throughout the rest of the war. In June 1945, Lieutenant Colonel Groves dispatched a composite group to provide antiaircraft defense for Kwajalein Atoll. The battalion sailed from the Marshalls in November 1945 and disbanded at Montford Point in January 1946.
51st Defense Battalion

This unit, like the 51st, was organized at Montford Point Camp, New River, North Carolina, and manned by African Americans commanded by white officers. Planned as a composite unit, the 52d took shape as a conventional defense battalion. It absorbed the pack howitzer crews made surplus when the 51st lost its composite status and retrained them in the employment of other weapons. Colonel Augustus W. Cockrell organized the unit, which he turned over to Lieutenant Colonel Joseph W. Earnshaw in July 1944. Under Earnshaw, the 52d the unit deployed to the Marshalls, arriving in October to man the antiaircraft defenses of Majuro Atoll and Roi-Namur in Kwajalein Atoll. Lieutenant Colonel David W. Silvey assumed command in January 1945, and between March and May the entire battalion deployed to Guam, remaining there for the rest of the war. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas C. Moore, Jr., replaced Silvey in May 1945, and in November, the 52d relieved the 51st at Kwajalein and Eniwetok Atolls before returning to Montford Point; where in May 1946 it became the 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion (Composite).
52nd Defense Battalion

Colonel Bernard Dubel formed the battalion at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where it defended the naval base throughout the war. In February 1944, Colonel Richard M. Cutts, Jr., took command. The unit became the 13th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 15 April and was disbanded after the war.
13th Defense Battalion

Activated at New River, North Carolina, by Lieutenant Colonel Harold C. Roberts, who was replaced in January 1944 by Lieutenant Colonel William C. Van Ryzin, the unit became the 18th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 16 May of that year. By August, echelons of the battalion were located at Saipan and Tinian, but by September it had come together on the latter island, where it remained until the end of the war.
18th Defense Battalion